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Tag: Death

Listen to your life. See it for the fathomless mystery that it is. In the boredom and the pain of it no less than the excitement and the gladness: touch, taste, smell your way to the holy and hidden heart of it because in the last analysis all moments are key moments, and life itself is grace 

Listen to your life. See it for the fathomless mystery that it is. In the boredom and the pain of it no less than the excitement and the gladness: touch, taste, smell your way to the holy and hidden heart of it because in the last analysis all moments are key moments, and life itself is grace 

— Frederick Buechner 

‘As Philip Yancey wrote, Buechner “tries to reawaken the child in people: the one who naïvely trusts, who will at least go and look for the magic place, who is not ashamed of not knowing the answers because he is not expected to know the answers.”’

”One of Buechner’s often cited observations is that you find your vocation at the spot where your deep gladness meets the world’s deep need. ”

”Buechner’s vocation was to show a way to experience the fullness of life. Of death, he wrote, “What’s lost is nothing to what’s found, and all the death that ever was, set next to life, would scarcely fill a cup.”

source

Once we acknowledge that limited time is remaining, although we don’t know if that is years, weeks, or hours, we are less driven by ego or by what other people think. Instead, we are more driven by what our hearts truly want. Acknowledging our inevitable, approaching death offers us the opportunity to find greater purpose and satisfaction in the time we have remaining

Once we acknowledge that limited time is remaining, although we don’t know if that is years, weeks, or hours, we are less driven by ego or by what other people think. Instead, we are more driven by what our hearts truly want. Acknowledging our inevitable, approaching death offers us the opportunity to find greater purpose and satisfaction in the time we have remaining

— Bronnie Ware from ”Top Five Regrets of the Dying: A Life Transformed by the Dearly Departing.”

Top five regrets of the dying

  • “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.”
  • “I wish I hadn’t worked so hard.”
  • “I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.”
  • “I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.”
  • “I wish that I had let myself be happier.”

Nothing passes through the great wall of death. Whether you’re a billionaire or a homeless person, everything goes to null in the face of the great equalizer. The only thing you may be able to preserve is a legacy, but that legacy is for other conscious minds to perceive, which is no longer a luxury you have upon hitting that wall

Nothing passes through the great wall of death. Whether you’re a billionaire or a homeless person, everything goes to null in the face of the great equalizer. The only thing you may be able to preserve is a legacy, but that legacy is for other conscious minds to perceive, which is no longer a luxury you have upon hitting that wall

— https://moretothat.com/the-nothingness-of-money/

”…

For most people, the Nothingness of Money strikes when the finish line is a few yards away. A terminal diagnosis is delivered. An appointment is made at a hospice center. A deathbed is prepared.

In this moment, a pursuit that once seemed all-consuming fades into the background. All that matters are the memories you have, the people you love, and the memories you can still make with them. The use of your finite time to squeeze out an extra dollar is laughable, as no one with a sound mind would expect that of you.

And finally, in this brief section of life, something profound happens.

The Nothingness of Money is truly understood.”

Flowers and leaves are just like people, really…

Flowers and leaves are just like people, really…

— Byeong-man Jo, 98 year old husband in documentary movie “My Love, Don’t Cross That River” 1 hour 15 minutes in

”… Come spring, the leaf sprouts.

Come summer, it grows big, soaking up the rain.

By autumn, the frost makes them fall, though.

People are no different.

We’re young, like sprouting leaves.

Then we bloom.

If we could stay in bloom forever, it’d be great but with age we begin to wither and then we fall.

And that’s the end. After the fall, there isn’t much else.”