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Somehow, within each of our brains, the combined activity of billions of neurons, each one a tiny biological machine, is giving rise to a conscious experience. And not just any conscious experience, your conscious experience, right here, right now. How does this happen? Why do we experience life in the first person?

Somehow, within each of our brains, the combined activity of billions of neurons, each one a tiny biological machine, is giving rise to a conscious experience. And not just any conscious experience, your conscious experience, right here, right now. How does this happen? Why do we experience life in the first person?

— From book “Being You: A New Science of Consciousness“

What are we all searching for?

What are we all searching for?

”When it comes to our dreams, each of us seems to be searching for something rather different. Some are chasing a long-held ambition – to become a famous author, or pianist, or bottle-cap collector. Others are searching for the perfect partner with whom they can raise a family. There are those who aspire to great wealth and luxury, while others who yearn for modest simplicity. Still more may be pursuing particular emotional states: to become calmer, less timid, or more present in the world.  

Yet, though our dreams look different on the surface, at heart, all of us are searching for pretty much the same thing. The Greeks called this quality eudaimonia: variously translated as ‘fulfillment’ or ‘flourishing. It is the sense that we have achieved our purpose in life; that our particular combination of talents and drives have attained their most ideal end. It’s feeling like we have found our fitting place in the cosmos. 

Achieving eudaimonia is no simple task: most of us will spend our lives embarked upon the search. Yet our search is more likely to bear fruit if we begin by investing in two key areas: self-knowledge and resilience. Namely, by gaining a deeper awareness of our personal sources of meaning, and building up the emotional strength required to achieve it.”

— School of Life (link)

Why has time disappeared in our culture?

Why has time disappeared in our culture?

— Jacob Needleman From “Money and the meaning of life” p. 29

… How is it that after decades of inventions and new technologies devoted to saving time and labor, the result is that there is no time left? We are a time-poor society: we are temporally impoverished. And there is no issue, no aspect of human life, that exceeds this in importance. The destruction of time is literally the destruction of life.

We rarely feel that our time is ‘our own.’ We rarely sense that we are consciously alive, now and here, free from compulsive worry about the past and the future, free fully to experience our lives. The coin of time has been degraded and cheapened to the point of vanishing.”

The best thing you can possibly do with your life is to tackle the motherfucking shit out of love…

The best thing you can possibly do with your life is to tackle the motherfucking shit out of love…

“Love is the feeling we have for those we care deeply about and hold in high regard. It can be light as the hug we give a friend or heavy as the sacrifices we make for our children. It can be romantic, platonic, familial, fleeting, everlasting, conditional, unconditional, imbued with sorrow, stoked by sex, sullied by abuse, amplified by kindness, twisted by betrayal, deepened by time, darkened by difficulty, leavened by generosity, nourished by humor, and “loaded with promises and commitments” that we may or may not want or keep. The best thing you can possibly do with your life is to tackle the motherfucking shit out of love.”

From Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar by Cheryl Strayed
You really don’t own anything in life. When you’re born, and you come out of your mother’s womb, and you’re kicking and screaming, and you go through your 60, 70, 80, 90 years of life, you think that you own stock and money, and this, that, and the other, but really, you don’t own anything, because it all disappears, it all goes away, and you die, and there’s nothing left. The only thing, the only thing that you own, the only thing that we can say is that you own time. You have so much time to live. … Let’s just say you have 85 years to live. That is yours … Alive time is time that’s your own. Nobody tells you what to do, nobody is commanding you how to spend it. … Taking ownership of your time means I only have this much time to live, I’d better make the most of it, I’d better make it alive time, I’d better be urgent, have a bit of an edge, be aware of each moment as it’s passing and not in a fog.

You really don’t own anything in life. When you’re born, and you come out of your mother’s womb, and you’re kicking and screaming, and you go through your 60, 70, 80, 90 years of life, you think that you own stock and money, and this, that, and the other, but really, you don’t own anything, because it all disappears, it all goes away, and you die, and there’s nothing left. The only thing, the only thing that you own, the only thing that we can say is that you own time. You have so much time to live. … Let’s just say you have 85 years to live. That is yours … Alive time is time that’s your own. Nobody tells you what to do, nobody is commanding you how to spend it. … Taking ownership of your time means I only have this much time to live, I’d better make the most of it, I’d better make it alive time, I’d better be urgent, have a bit of an edge, be aware of each moment as it’s passing and not in a fog.

— Robert Greene